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my magical time in Montréal

my magical time in Montréal
After communicating with The Duchesse for 8 years via email,
I decided it was time to finally meet her in person.
She is the author of the fashion / practical advice blog
If you are not already an avid follower...
trust me, follow the link and let her delight your inbox!
Arriving in Montréal, was met with a charming apartment, macarons, and a fantastic meeting face to face with a woman I had revered for so long. 
Duchesse handed me a map of the city and a metro card, and carefully laid out the adventures she had tailored to my interests. 
I was in heaven. 
We talked incessantly about art, culture, womanhood, fashion and of course pearls. 
We wandered the streets and the gorgeous open air market of Villeray. 
We even got to see Chance the Rapper at the Bell Centre. 
One morning we  went to the Guild Gallery downtown where I was honored to meet Janis Kerman
Janis was having an exhibition of her 45years of contemporary jewelry!
She was so gracious to show me each and every piece in the show. 
She is SUCH an inspiring woman. 
A dear friend of mine dropped in from Toronto for 24 hours with a suitcase full of gemstones and we had a great time catching up.
With the Janis Kerman show behind me and all these colorful gems in front of me, I felt fueled for the next round of original Kojima designs. 
The Duchesse introduced me to some of the best shopping.
 At nearly every turn we  enjoyed AMAZING food and of course ice cream! 
 
Montréal is a phenomenal city with a diverse population of really really nice people, fantastic public transportation and a deep appreciation for the arts...
the best part, by far was meeting The Duc and Duchesse and hearing about their lives and having the opportunity to see the city through their eyes.
They are truly magical beings leading a life we all aspire to. 
Four days was not nearly enough time, and it was also a perfect time. 
 Score one for the internet that brought us together. 

 

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Japan Kasumi – cultured fresh water pearls from “beyond the mist”

Japan Kasumi – cultured fresh water pearls from “beyond the mist”
This year (2016) the Pearl-Guide Ruckus was the biggest yet!
Stay tuned for more news on this AMAZING weekend in pearls!
I gave a presentation about our precious Japan Kasumi pearls.
For those of you who asked for the presentation in print.. or who couldn’t make it.
Here is my presentation and a few more accompanying slides.

I’ll start with my teachers teacher:
Several twists of fate landed Rudolf in Japan during
WWII with $20 and a camera.
While in the mink business, he started working with
pearls in 1938.
In his own words,
“he was in the business of cultured pearls before anyone wanted them”

Fuji Voll (my teacher) grew up with an intimate knowledge of the pearl industry.

Here he is at the age of 3 in 1951 at the family pearl farm in Japan.

By the early 1950’s Pacific Pearls had a retail shop in the Ginza district of Tokyo ..

selling mostly Akoya pearl jewelry to tourists and also fresh water pearls from Lake Biwa in Japan.

It was during this golden age of pearls that Rudolf met Mr. Uda… They stayed friends for 40 more years.

Mr. Uda was to fresh water pearls what Mikimoto was to Akoya pearls.. he was the money bags.

(note his henchmen) :)

Dr. Fujita was Mr. Uda’s teacher, he was also directly responsible for populating Lake Kasumi ga Ura with pearly mussels from Lake Biwa in Japan.

Decades later he created the first pearl farmers cooperative in Lake Kasumi ga Ura.

Kasumi ga Ura translates to the “body of water beyond the mist”.

Located some 40 miles from Tokyo, it is not really a lake but a gigantic river delta that flows to the Pacific Ocean.

Pearls are farmed in the river tributaries

Pictured here in the Spring. It is teeming with life.

Today Japan Kasumi pearls are produced using a hybrid mussel.. a cross between the

Japanese Hyriopsis shlegelii

and the

Chinese Hyriopsis Cumingii

The nucleation method used today is based on Mr. Uda’s technique from the 1920’s!!

Using an ice pick the technician picks up the thru- drilled bead and a small piece of mantel tissue.

After the bead is insterted into the body of the animal, the mantel tissue is slightly sucked up into the hole of the bead, ensuring a higher percentage of retention.

This is an x-ray of a strand of Japan Kasumi pearls ,

it was made by our family dentist..

You can see the crossing lines of drilled nucleus and drilled pearl.

By the 1980’s Lake Biwa was not producing pearls, the water level was much too low and pollution had taken it’s toll.

Lake Kasumi has also suffered great loss due to pollution, although it has never completely ceased to grown pearls.

At it’s height there were 30 pearl farms, today there are only 3!!!

After the fall of Lake Biwa and the near disasters at Lake Kasumi many Japanese technicians looked to China for work..

many of them were misled with lofty promises.

In the end the seeding techniques that they brought with them gave rise to the pearls we see coming out of China today.

The farmers currently in production in Lake Kasumi today did a HUGE amount of work with the local government to help clean up the lake.

Working to ensure it’s health for generations to come.

BOW DOWN!

Having grown up with Mr. Uda, Fuji met Yanasesan in the early 1980’s.

Fuji was his first customer when he started producing bead nucleated pearls in Lake Kasumi.

(Yanasesan had , for two decades prior been producing tissue nucleated pearls in Lake Kasumi which were bought by OPEC countries and most likely marketed as natural pearls)

I have been accompanying Fuji on buying trips to Lake Kasumi ga Ura since 1996.

I’ve seen them through great years of success and times of deep sorrow.

(in 2003 there was a horrible blight, and in 2011 a devastating earthquake .. both of these events compromised pearl production in big numbers)

We visit the pearl farm once or twice a year and personally choose each and every pearl we bring to market.

Like almost any harvest, most of the pearls are baroque.. With Japan Kasumi, it is the baroque pearls that have the characteristic dreamy color play and dramatic metallic luster.

Round Japan Kasumi pearls are quite precious and often command much more formal attention worldwide.

There are absolutely NO treatments done to Japan Kasumi pearls.

After harvest they are rubbed with salt and washed with fresh water.

Japan Kasumi pearls are NEVER dyed black, silver or any other color.

Why would you buy Japan Kasumi pearls, especially with China producing similar pearls for often a fraction of the price.

Provenance and the story of the three remaining farmers at Lake Kasumi ga Ura is what sells these pearls.

Like Sea of Cortez pearls and Kamoka pearls.. these pearls are special and they are rare.

Often times the challenges far outweigh the benefits of farming and yet these pearl farmers persevere.

Every year I field dozens of emails from people asking if their pearls are truly from Lake Kasumi ga Ura.

I have written numerous blog posts about the subject.

I won’t bore you with all the inane details of these emails.. but in short these were all sales that happened because of a lack of knowledge on both the seller and the customers part.

As we all know with on line shopping, if it seems to good to be true.. it IS!

Japan Kasumi pearls will never be the same price as Chinese fresh water pearls..

there is just too big of adiscrepancy in cost of living and size of production.

If you are buying pearls to get a “good deal” and pay less.

Japan Kasumi pearls are not for you.

They are special and rare and they always will be.

As a side note : Kasumiga is a BRAND NAME.. it should not be confused with provenance.

So let’s say it out loud together.

They are called Japan Kasumi

Japan Kasumi pearls.

NOT ANYTHING ELSE..

Just JAPAN KASUMI PEARLS.

We believe in the magic of Japan Kasumi pearls..

We believe in the power of pearls to be the canaries of the waters they are grown in.

The more money and attention that is paid to pearls, the more likely the farmers are to ensure clean waters for their animals.

Pearls are the ONE and ONLY gem in the entire jewelry industry that is actually GOOD for the environment..

and these last remaining farmers did their part to keep this water as healthy as it can be.

They deserve our respect and attention.

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DIY Guide : how to make a genuine Japan Kasumi pearl necklace

DIY Guide : how to make a genuine Japan Kasumi pearl necklace
Part I :
Get on an airplane, travel to JAPAN. Meet with the actual people who farm these rare pearls in Lake Kasumi ga Ura. Drink tea, giggle, negotiate and buy their pearls.
Part II:
After carefully navigating the import duty procedures and a good night’s sleep, sort the pearls by shape, size, luster, surface quality and color.

Part III:

Carefully drill each pearl using a specialized machine. Ventilation and patience required. https://www.facebook.com/KojimaPearlCompany/

Part IV:

Wash the drilled pearls in fresh clear water, we recommend using Mt. Shasta spring water (but any old mystical mountain water will do).

https://www.facebook.com/KojimaPearlCompany/

Part V: Carefully choose each pearl for the strand to create wearable art , showcasing not just each pearl but the fluid glow of a true heirloom.

Part VI: String the pearls on your choice of thread , learn to knot pearls (expect some amount of frustration at the onset), choose a clasp and create a truly one of a kind piece of natural history.

Speaking of history... Did you know that one of our Japan Kasumi pearl necklaces was featured in the Pearls Exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History in NYC in 2002? It toured around the world with the exhibit for many years after that!

 

 

There are a select handful of online pearl dealers who are currently carrying genuine Japan Kasumi pearls (besides ourselves and our family company Pacific Pearls ).
If you would like me to introduce you to them, please feel free to email me.
The rest of them are either misleading or being mislead.. or both.
As always, to make educated choices as to which pearls you should buy and wish to avoid look no further than Pearl-Guide.com
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Sea of Cortez pearl harvest part I

Sea of Cortez pearl harvest part I
After multiple flights and bus rides, we arrived in Guaymas, Mexico …
just as a tropical storm was winding down. The clouds were heavy and the gusts of wind warm and refreshing. Our hotel was built in the 1800’s and the architecture is gorgeous. Generous arches, hand carved wooden details and expansive plazas decorate the shoreline looking out over Bacochibampo Bay.
We finished the evening with Douglas McLaurin and his lovely wife Elisabeth eating ice cream made from local fruits, and wandering through down town. Douglas is an endless source of historic and scientific facts. I learned that Guaymas once boasted many foreign embassies and was a pivotal port for goods destined for the U.S.
Today the European architecture is what remains of that bustling time. Guaymas is also the home town of three Mexican presidents.
This morning I took my coffee in the shade of a giant cactus. Douglas picked me up for smoked marlin fish tacos for breakfast before heading to the farm.
The Sea of Cortez pearl farm consists of a gorgeous lofty white gift shop and offices.
The farmers and their staff have created a fantastic display of tools, shells and equipment to truly educate their guests in all the steps it takes to raise these very rare pearls. The jewelry store is lovely, and is complimented by two lovely ladies with warm smiles: Rocio Mendoza and Carolina Bazua. It boasts the work of many talented designers and artisans. The farm is really a destination in Guaymas and guided tours are given daily.
I’ve never seen a pearl shop with a better view!
The Sea of Cortez pearl farm crew work seamlessly.
Wise eyed men sing sweetly while bringing baskets of oysters in from the warm waters.
The oysters are opened and split in half.
Then comes the fun part! We SQUISH through the guts to find each and every pearl!
I was thankful for the full length aprons and matching boots!
Pearl harvesting is a messy business and these guys do it in style!
Enrique Arizmendi and Manuel Nava painstakingly record the pearl count and quality harvested from each basket.
After the pearls are harvested the shells and meat are separated.
The shells are cleaned and sorted. The best quality to be used as inlay, the others allowed to dry naturally. The meat is cleaned and cut to be sold as sea food.

The oysters used at the Sea of Cortez pearl farm are Pteria sterna .. Otherwise known as the “rainbow lipped shell”
It’s really no wonder!
Daniel Duarte, a very pleasant man, is in charge of web sales and photography and I must say I envy his job!

After harvesting was over we pored over the mabe pearl stock and matched pairs. Then we went for lunch in San Carlos.
We sat next to the harbor and learned that there is much truth in the description of it being a “drinking village with a fishing problem”

It was a fantastic first day and we’re looking forward to day two!
Being at a harvest is “what it’s all about”… The hokey pokey for a pearl dealer!!

 

 

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